It never seems to quite resolve itself, evidently.

Engineering College of Aarhus:

Everybody who is staying in Denmark is entitled to hospital assistance in case of accidents, emergency illness or emergent worsening of an illness.
EEA nationals who are covered by the public health insurance of an EEA country will be covered by the public health insurance when they move to Denmark. If you move to Denmark from a non-Nordic country which is not a member of the EC/EAA you will normally have a six week quarantine before having access to public health services.

University of Copenhagen:

– Non-EU students
If you are a students staying in Denmark for more than 3 months and you are not an EU-citizen, you will not be covered by the Danish health care system until 6 weeks after you have applied for it. It is strongly advised, that you are covered by a privately arranged health care system in your home country for the first 8 weeks of your stay in Denmark.

Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark:

Other countries
People from other countries are not entitled to any free medical care, except the emergency hospital treatment, mentioned above, and they are therefore urged to obtain a private health insurance.

Study in Denmark:

People on a temporary stay in Denmark

– Other countries
People from other countries are not entitled to any free medical care, except the emergency hospital treatment, mentioned above, and they are therefore urged to obtain a private health insurance.

People with residence in Denmark

Those, who are registered with the municipal civil registration office in Denmark, are automatically covered by Denmark’s health insurance scheme after a period of six weeks. Hence, it is strongly recommended that you arrange for health insurance to cover any incidental medical bills for the first eight weeks of your stay – eight weeks in order to be sure to be covered by an insurance in case the issue of the Danish Health Service card is to be delayed.

OK, so the universities think I should be fine, Study in Denmark hinges this on whether I am “temporary” or “in residence”, and the Foreign Affairs Ministry says I am a total no-go. Personally, I am leaning towards “you get covered after 6 weeks”, but I still can’t be sure. If that turns out to be the case, then my health insurance costs would be dramatically lowered: I’ll still need to get some, but it would only have to be for 2 months, not 12.

The quote I got from Denmark private insurance is crazy expensive. One of my friends has another friend who’s working in an insurance company, and I’m trying to see if I can get any quotes from Malaysia. Is there a way I can look up insurance quotes without being obliged to buy the plan? I need to do some comparison shopping – and besides, I won’t even know if I need it till May next year.

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